Home Healthcare Researchers Use Conductive Carbon Fibers to Repair Damaged Electrical Circuits in Mice’s Hearts
Researchers Use Conductive Carbon Fibers to Repair Damaged Electrical Circuits in Mice’s Hearts

Researchers Use Conductive Carbon Fibers to Repair Damaged Electrical Circuits in Mice’s Hearts

These findings were without pacemaker and when the fibers were removed the circuit disrupted again.

A healthy heart’s functioning depends upon the healthy circulation of electric signals as it maintains a steady rhythm. If the system gets damaged it leads to severe consequences. Most of the times such cases are handled with either pacemaker or medications. However, researchers are now developing better solutions such as damages where they have used carbon fiber threads electrical bridges to keep the signals circulating. The research was conducted at Texas Heart Institute and was conducted by Dr. Mehadi Razavi. Dr. Razavi has previously worked in this sector though this time a team of researchers from Rice University teamed-up for this study.  

Researchers developed very fine carbon fiber threads with electrical conductivity. Each thread measured a quarter of the width of human hair and was non-toxic, polymer-coated. These treads were embedded with tens of millions of microscopic nanotubes from inside and their tips were stripped back to serve as electrodes. Teams sewed these threads through damaged tissues in the hearts of mice, which allowed electric signals to carry on traveling back and forth. Prior to this study, the rodents experienced disruptions in electrical signals in their hearts, however, fibers proved to be effective in restoring the signals over a month-long testing period.

These findings were without pacemaker and when the fibers were removed the circuit disrupted again. "Our experiments provided the first scientific support for using a synthetic material-based treatment rather than a drug to treat the leading cause of sudden death in the US and many developing countries around the world," explained Dr. Razavi. It is also true there’s a lot of work to be done, before it is ready for clinical use, though early signs are promising.   


Anagha Kulkarni
Anagha Kulkarni,

Anagha Kulkarni
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